Wednesday, February 18, 2015

VIETNAM WAR NEWSLETTER #6, FEB. 18, 2015

OMNI
VIETNAM WAR NEWSLETTER #6, Feb. 18, 2015.
Compiled by Dick Bennett for a Culture of Peace, Justice, and Ecology. 
  (#1 July 24, 2011; #2 June 9, 2012; #3 Sept. 25, 2012; #4 April 13, 2013; #5, April 9, 2014).  Thanks to Marc.

2015, the 50th anniversary of the start of US direct combat operations in Vietnam.

What’s at stake:
We must not forget this atrocious war, the destruction and suffering it caused for no good purpose.   The Pentagon, President Obama, and others are trying to turn it into part of US patriotic history.  Let us instead seek the truth about the war—and all the other US wars since WWII..

My blog:  War Department and Peace Department
Newsletters:
Index:
See: Agent Orange, Air War, Chemical War, Civilian Deaths and Suffering, Deceit, Imperialism, Kissinger, Killing Civilians, Land Mines, Literature About the War, Lying, Militarism, Nixon, Pentagon, Propaganda, Protest, Recruiting, Suicides, Torture, US Westward Empire, VFP, War Crimes, Waste, Whistleblowing, and more.

Contents #5 at end.

Contents Vietnam War Newsletter #6  Feb. 18, 2015

Telling the Truth about the War vs. Pentagon/Pres. Obama’s “Rehabilitation”
Veterans for Peace project, "Full Disclosure”
Sally Kohn, Pentagon Whitewash
Schell, Rev. of  Turse’s Kill Everything That Moves
Christian Appy’s Books
    Working Class War
     Patriots
     American Reckoning
      TomGram: Christian Appy, “Honor” the Vietnam War, Forget the War
Books Reviewed or Cited in OMNI’s Vietnam War Newsletters Nos. 1-6

Struggle at Home
Lemisch, Historians, American Historical Profession

Peacemaking During the War
Celebration of Peacemakers in May
Judy Wu, Radicals on the Road

Consequences of the War: To US and Vietnamese Troops and Nations
What It Did To Our Troops:  Film We Went to War by Michael Grigsby
Suffering of Vietnamese Civilians, Google Search, Feb. 18, 2015.



Contact President Obama
Contents Vietnam War Newsletter #5



Full Disclosure: Telling the Truth vs. Obama Admin. “Rehabilitation” of the War (see Newsletter #3, 2012)

From HAW:  the Veterans for Peace project entitled "Full Disclosure: Toward and Honest Commemoration of the American War in Vietnam" has updated its website, including a highly detailed timeline through 1965. Organizers point out that next year will mark the fiftieth anniversary of major landmarks in the war's escalation as well as resistance, such as the teach-in movement. They hope to stimulate local observances around the country.

The Pentagon’s Pathetic Vietnam Whitewash

By

A Pentagon website intended to mark the 50th anniversary of America’s war in Vietnam does a disservice to history.

It’s the biggest snow job of 2015—and you probably haven’t heard about it.
This year is the 50th anniversary of the start of the Vietnam War. It was on March 8, 1965 that the United States dispatched 3,500 Marines to Vietnam, officially starting our ground war there. And now the Pentagon is running a campaign apparently to commemorate the Vietnam War by whitewashing it.
According to reporting last fall by the New York Times:
The effort, which is expected to cost taxpayers nearly $15 million by the end of this fiscal year, is intended to honor veterans and, its website says, “provide the American public with historically accurate materials” suitable for use in schools.
But the extensive website, which has been up for years, largely describes a war of valor and honor that would be unrecognizable to many of the Americans who fought in and against it.
The website, for instance, barely mentions the mistakes and atrocities on the battlefield for which America’s military was responsible. Nor does it say much about the extraordinary protest marches and heated political debates that embroiled our nation during the fighting. It’s so bad, in fact, that 500 veterans, scholars and activists have signed a petition challenging the Pentagon’s whitewashed version of history.
Those signing include Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the top-secret “Pentagon Papers” — a pivotal event in public awareness and reaction to the war, but barely a footnote in the history the Pentagon is telling. The Pentagon also leaves out the illegal measures the Nixon administration took to prevent their publication, or how Ellsberg and another leaker were tried on espionage charges.
Regarding the “Gulf of Tonkin Incident” that helped propel the United States into the Vietnam War, the Pentagon website says that on August 2, 1964, the USS Maddox and USS Turner Joy were attacked by North Vietnamese ships and returned fire. The Pentagon papers later revealed that the North Vietnamese had not struck first but this error isn't corrected in this supposedly correct commemoration. 
It was a stupid war, and the more we learn since, the clearer that has become.
Two days later, on August 4, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson announced to the United States that because North Vietnamese warships had engaged in retaliatory fire on that night against the Maddox and Turner Joy, he would be seeking authorization for military engagement.
According to the Pentagon Papers, not only did the second attack never take place, the military and the White House knew it didn’t happen. Nonetheless, they spun the tale as the primary justification for war. Yet this is how that massive and deliberate lie is mildly footnoted on the Pentagon memorial website: “However, later analyses of those reports make it clear that North Vietnamese naval forces did not attack the Maddox of the Turner Joy that night.” The profound gravity of this error, let alone its concoction, is omitted.
An earlier version of the website referred to the My Lai massacre, in which American troops killed hundreds of Vietnamese civilians, and the “My Lai incident.” And the current version of the website seems to distance the massacre from broader US culpability, noting it was “elements” of a “division” that did the killing (as opposed to broader language, like “American troops”). And most of the scant text is devoted to noting that while “men” (as opposed to “soldiers”) were charged in the crime, only one was convicted.
Also, the Vietnam commemoration website seems like Matthew Broderick might have coded it in the 1980s, which just adds insult to injury.
We’re spending taxpayer money on a snow job for a war that cost $111 billion dollars 50 years ago—or $738 billion (PDF) in 2011 dollars. Not to mention the “cost” of the 58,220 American soldiers and over 3 million Vietnamese civilians and soldiers who died, the untold devastation to land and infrastructure in Vietnam, and the long-term trauma of Vietnamese and Americans involved in the war.
And that’s not all. For instance, the United States spent $17 million a day in inflation-adjusted dollars dropping bombs on Laos in a secret bombing campaign. Many of those bombs, around 80 million or so, didn’t explode and remain scattered around the Lao countryside. Last January, Congress approved a fraction of what’s needed—just $12 million for unexploded ordinance removal. All the while approving at least $15 million to whitewash commemorate the war in which we dropped said bombs.
It’s more than ironic that, were it not for the flat out lies about the Gulf of Tonkin, the United States would have never launched full out war against the North Vietnamese, or committed over 2.5 million American troops within the borders of the conflict—and many more beyond. And yet despite protests and deaths and suffering and lies that defined the Vietnam War, our country chooses to commemorate the war not with a factual historical reckoning, but with more lies.
Silly Pentagon. We already had plenty of evasions and deceptions about the Vietnam War. We didn’t need a commemorative occasion to spread more.
The soldiers who served in the Vietnam War, who gave their lives in service of our country and those still alive today, deserve to be honored and commemorated. And those among us who witnessed that tumultuous period in foreign policy and domestic protest can use the occasion of this anniversary to reckon with, or even try and reconcile, the past.
But the history of the Vietnam War cannot be rewritten. It was a stupid war, and the more we learn since, the clearer that has become.
America has, sadly, fought other stupid wars since. Certainly the second war in Iraq comes to mind. Arguably Afghanistan. We need to learn from our history in order to stop repeating it, facing the ugly truth with open eyes — not spending taxpayer money to blow snow in our faces.


By Jonathan Schell, TomDispatch.com, posted May 4 via HAW 5-7-2014.
A review essay on Nick Turse's book Kill Everything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.


Christian Appy, Books on Vietnam War
“His dissertation received the Ralph Henry Gabriel dissertation prize from the American Studies Association.[2] It went on to become his first book, Working Class War: American Combat Soldiers and Vietnam. Appy taught at Harvard and MIT before accepting a position in the history department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, in 2004. His book Patriots: The Vietnam War Remembered from All Sides is widely assigned to college students studying the Vietnam War, due to its unique and nearly comprehensive view of those involved in the war. In April 2013, he won the UMASS Distinguished Teaching Award. Professor Appy is married to Katherine Appy, and has 2 children and 3 step children. Chris and his family live in Amherst, Massachusetts. His new book, American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity, [was released] in early 2015.”   From HAW, 2-4-15.  Information is available at http://www.christianappy.com.

Christian Appy, Working Class War

Christian Appy, Patriots

Christian Appy, American Reckoning
Vietnam War:  A new book by Christian Appy, author of two previous books on the Vietnam War, is being released by Viking Press tomorrow, February 5, with the title American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity.   




Tomgram: Christian Appy, "Honor" the Vietnam Veteran, Forget the War
TomDispatch tomdispatch@nationinstitute.org via uark.edu 



to James  2-8-15
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif
TomDispatch.com: A Regular Antidote to the Mainstream Media


[Note to TomDispatch Readers: We have an interesting offer today and I’d like to give you the “Engelhardt guarantee” on it. When my kids were young and nervous about doing something that I was certain would work out well, I would assure them that they had the “Engelhardt guarantee.” It was ironclad. Now, I’m offering the same guarantee on a new work by historian (and today’s TD author) Christian AppyAmerican Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity. I just finished it and it’s a hell of a book! I wrote about Vietnam at length in my Cold War history, The End of Victory Culture, but to my surprise I found myself repeatedly caught off guard by the information Appy has to offer and his insights into how that war helped shape our world. We’re offering signed, personalized copies of American Reckoning to TD enthusiasts in return for contributions of $100 (or more) to this site. (Check out our donation page for the details.) If you have any interest in the Vietnam War, you should get your hands on this book. (Click herefor one path to doing so.)

I asked TD Managing Editor Nick Turse, who -- someone told me -- knows a tad about Vietnam himself to write today’s introduction. I would also insist that you get your hands on his bestselling book, Kill Anything That Moves, The Real American War in Vietnam, if I didn’t think that all TD readers had already done so! Tom]

Suddenly he appeared, riding in the back of a truck, his arms thrust to the heavens, his fists clenched tight. I couldn’t believe my eyes. It was Ho Chi Minh, modern Vietnam’s founding father... and he was holding dumbbells.

It was 2010, the eve of the 35th anniversary of the fall of Saigon -- though it was known in Vietnam as Liberation Day -- and the city was readying itself for a major celebration: a massive parade, fireworks, the whole shebang. That float, adorned with Olympic rings, was apparently designed to exhort Vietnamese onlookers to embrace physical fitness, though no reputable fitness trainer in the world would teach the form of standing shoulder presses being performed on that truck by that papier-mâché “Uncle Ho.”

Nations sometimes commemorate their war victories in strange ways. Not that I have first-hand experience. I grew up in the wake of the Vietnam War, so -- like all Americans since the end of World War II -- I never saw the celebration of a major victory. Perhaps somewhere, someone commemorated the triumphs over the tiny island of Grenada and the minimalist forces of Panama. There were, apparently, celebrations of the Gulf War before it was clear that meddling in Iraq would turn into a decades-long American debacle,



though they didn’t make an impression on me.

What I remember, instead, was a different kind of celebration, a long, meandering moment famously labeled “it’s morning again in America” in a TV ad for Ronald Reagan’s presidential campaign. A nation hobbled by the real Uncle Ho, deindustrialization, and a raft of poorly conceived policies that had come home to roost was being gilded back to greatness by a spinmeister-in-chief in the Oval Office -- and Hollywood and the toy companies loved it. For me, it meant rousing times watching Rambo and “G.I. Joe” and Red Dawn.Rocky took on a towering Soviet superman, the Evil Empire’s boxing champ, and chopped him down to size. The president flipped the script after the phrase “Star Wars,” taken from George Lucas’s trilogy, was slapped on his fantastical “high frontier” defense boondoggle by critics. “If you will pardon my stealing a film line,” he said, “the Force is with us.” And if Mr. Gorbachev wouldn’t tear down that wall -- you know, the one in Berlin -- well, Mr. Reagan might just blow it to smithereens with an MX missile. It was a celebratory time, but remind me now, what exactly were we celebrating?

It took me years to wrap my head around what I had lived through, to understand how my entire world had been deformed by the American war in Vietnam and the reaction to our devastating defeat there. I only began to figure this out, mind you, after I processed the fact that these distortions didn’t end with my Reagan-era childhood. But what did it all mean?

Fortunately, Christian Appy helped open my eyes with Patriots, his superb oral history of the Vietnam War from all sides.  In his new tour de force history, American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity, he goes even further, drawing on a staggering range of sources, from Pentagon documents and Bruce Springsteen songs to a forgotten bestseller and Tom Cruise’s Top Gun flyboy fantasy.  In the process, he grapples with the ways the Vietnam War came home, how it transformed American culture and shaped our society from the 1950s to just last week.  How did an idealistic crusade to save poor Asians from godless communism end in a made-in-America bloodbath?  And how did we respond?  InAmerican Reckoning, drawing on long-ignored sources and his unique way of analyzing things, Appy explodes the myth of American exceptionalism in a genuinely original way.

Today, he takes the lessons of Vietnam further still, examining how a willful societal amnesia about what we did in Vietnam paved the way for an era of endless war. While predicting the future is dicey indeed, here’s a forecast I feel confident about given Washington’s continued misreading of the Vietnam War: in your lifetime, you won’t see a float of George H.W. Bush doing sumo squats on the anniversary of the end of the Gulf War, nor one of his son doing bicep curls to commemorate the start of the surge in the Iraq War that followed.  Distressingly enough, our third go-round in Iraq shares many of the hallmarks of our 1950s efforts in Vietnam, so hold off on the Obama-doing-chin-ups float, too.

Until the United States comes to grips with the grim reality of the Vietnam War, it’s hard to imagine Washington moving much beyond its usual diet of foreign policy failures and military fiascos.  Picking up a copy of American Reckoning would be a great first step in the other direction. Nick Turse
Burying Vietnam, Launching Perpetual War 
How Thanking the Veteran Meant Ignoring What Happened 
By Christian Appy
The 1960s -- that extraordinary decade -- is celebrating its 50th birthday one year at a time. Happy birthday, 1965! How, though, do you commemorate the Vietnam War, the era’s signature catastrophe? After all, our government prosecuted its brutal and indiscriminate war under false pretexts, long after most citizens objected, and failed to achieve any of its stated objectives. More than 58,000 Americans were killed along with more than four million Vietnamese, Laotians, and Cambodians.
So what exactly do we write on the jubilee party invitation? You probably know the answer. We’ve been rehearsing it for decades. You leave out every troubling memory of the war and simply say: “Let’s honor all our military veterans for their service and sacrifice.”
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Fortunately, Christian Appy helped open my eyes with Patriots, his superb oral history of the Vietnam War from all sides.  In his new tour de force history, American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity, he goes even further, drawing on a staggering range of sources, from Pentagon documents and Bruce Springsteen songs to a forgotten bestseller and Tom Cruise’s Top Gun flyboy fantasy.  In the process, he grapples with the ways the Vietnam War came home, how it transformed American culture and shaped our society from the 1950s to just last week.  How did an idealistic crusade to save poor Asians from godless communism end in a made-in-America bloodbath?  And how did we respond?  In American Reckoning, drawing on long-ignored sources and his unique way of analyzing things, Appy explodes the myth of American exceptionalism in a genuinely original way.

Today, he takes the lessons of Vietnam further still, examining how a willful societal amnesia about what we did in Vietnam paved the way for an era of endless war. While predicting the future is dicey indeed, here’s a forecast I feel confident about given Washington’s continued misreading of the Vietnam War: in your lifetime, you won’t see a float of George H.W. Bush doing sumo squats on the anniversary of the end of the Gulf War, nor one of his son doing bicep curls to commemorate the start of the surge in the Iraq War that followed.  Distressingly enough, our third go-round in Iraq shares many of the hallmarks of our 1950s efforts in Vietnam, so hold off on the Obama-doing-chin-ups float, too.

Until the United States comes to grips with the grim reality of the Vietnam War, it’s hard to imagine Washington moving much beyond its usual diet of foreign policy failures and military fiascos.  Picking up a copy of American Reckoning would be a great first step in the other direction. Nick Turse
Burying Vietnam, Launching Perpetual War 
How Thanking the Veteran Meant Ignoring What Happened 
By Christian Appy
The 1960s -- that extraordinary decade -- is celebrating its 50th birthday one year at a time. Happy birthday, 1965! How, though, do you commemorate the Vietnam War, the era’s signature catastrophe? After all, our government prosecuted its brutal and indiscriminate war under false pretexts, long after most citizens objected, and failed to achieve any of its stated objectives. More than 58,000 Americans were killed along with more than four million Vietnamese, Laotians, and Cambodians.
So what exactly do we write on the jubilee party invitation? You probably know the answer. We’ve been rehearsing it for decades. You leave out every troubling memory of the war and simply say: “Let’s honor all our military veterans for their service and sacrifice.”





BOOKS REVIEWED OR CITED IN OMNI’S VIETNAM WAR NEWSLETTERS
BOOKS:
Newsletter 6.
Lemisch, Historians, American Historical Profession, 1975
Christian Appy’s Books
    Working Class War, 2004
     Patriots, 2013
     American Reckoning, 2015
Judy Wu, Radicals on the Road, 2013
Newsletter 5.
Kirschner, Grave Lines, Book of Poetry
Voices from the Plain of Jars:  Life under an Air War (2nd ed.). 
      Edited by Fred Branfman with essays and drawings by Laotian villagers 
Newsletter 4.

Valley of Death By Ted Morgan 

The Catonsville Nine: A Story of Faith and Resistance in the Vietnam Era by Shawn Francis Peters.

Newsletter 3.

The Lotus Unleashed: The Buddhist Peace Movement in South Vietnam, 1964-1966  by Robert J. Topmiller .

Red Clay On My Boots  by Robert J. Topmiller. Kirk House Publishers.

Binding Their Wounds: America's Assault on Its Veterans•     Robert J. Topmiller and T. Kerby Neill.  Paradigm,

Newsletter 2.
--Nick Turse.    Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.    2013.
JOHN TIRMAN.  The Deaths of Others: The Fate of Civilians in America’s Wars.   THE DEATHS OF OTHERS: THE FATE OF CIVILIANS IN AMERICA’S WARS.  Oxford, 2011.    The Vietnam War part of a hundred years of US wars against civilian populations.   Chapter 5, “The Vietnam War: The High Cost of Credibility.”
Newsletter 1.
--Anderson, David and John Ernst, eds.  The War That Never Ends: New Perspectives on the Vietnam War.  UP of Kentucky, 2007.  Rev. Peace and Change (April 2010).  The lasting impact of the war on US foreign policy.  It’s a “watershed moment.”
--Marlantes, Karl.  Matterhorn: A Novel of the Vietnam War.  Atlantic Monthly, 2010.    Ad in Harper’s (July 2010). 
--The Palace Files by Jerry Schecter and Nguyen Hung,
--Richard Stacewicz.  Winter Soldiers: an Oral History of Vietnam Veterans Against the War.  Haymarket, 2008.  Rev. Fellowship (Fall 2009).



Struggle at Home
 Jesse Lemisch’s long-out-of-print On Active Service in War and Peace: Politics and Ideology in the American Historical Profession (1975)based on a paper he delivered at the 1969 AHA convention, is now available on-line. Here are links to it on the History News network site and Academia.Edu.

    Sent BY HAW (2014)




PEACEMAKING DURING THE WAR

Also regarding the Vietnam War, the ad hoc project Peace Commemoration is planning a May 2 convention in Washington. D.C. honoring the Vietnam-era peace movement. There is not yet a website, but information can be obtained by writing to peace.commemoration@gmail.com or to David.B.Cortright.1@nd.edu.


International Antiwar Coalitions During Vietnam War   
REVIEW: Vietnam War Era Journeys: Recovering Histories of Internationalism by Michele HardestyMonthly Review (Oct. 2014)  
Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013), 346 pages, $26.95, paperback.
The cover of Judy Tzu-Chun Wu’s Radicals on the Road features a sepia-toned photograph of Eldridge Cleaver raising his fist in a Black Power salute behind three Vietnamese women in combat helmets, one of whom is kneeling behind an anti-aircraft gun. While you have probably seen a similar photograph of Jane Fonda from her North Vietnam trip in 1972, images like that of Cleaver are less common, if circulated at all. In this second book by Wu, she documents three sets of journeys, like Cleaver’s, that have remained at the margins of both the scholarship and the popular memory of the antiwar movement.… | more |   [Wu documents three sets of journeys “of traveling radicals who consciously crossed national borders and made coalitions across race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in order to build an international antiwar movement.”  Wu’s subject in Section One, “Journeys for Peace,” is Robert Span Browne, a leader for black liberation in the US and for decolonization in the Third World from the 1930s to the 1970s.  In Section Two, “Journeys for Liberation,” she recounts the tour of North Korea, North Vietnam, and China in 1970 by the U.S. People’s Anti-Imperialist Delegation, headed by Black Panther Party leader Eldridge Cleaver and Ramparts editor Robert Scheer.  And in Section Three, “Journeys for Global Sisterhood,” she examines the Indochinese Women’s Conferences in 1971 in Canada.  –Dick]


Consequences of the War
What It Did to US Troops
Two Films by Michael Grigsby, I Was a Soldier and Its Sequel We Went to War, Google Searche Oct. 27, 2014
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Grigsby
Wikipedia
With a filmography spanning six decades and nearly 30 films, Grigsby ... Apart, 1973), the survivors on both sides of the Vietnam War (I Was a Soldier, 1970; The ...
www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZzlCLKf-nc
Feb 7, 2012 - Uploaded by FilmsDocumentaires
Voir le film en entier: http://www.filmsdocumentaires.com/films/1289-i-was-a-soldierEn 1970, Michael ...
www.theguardian.com › Culture › Movies › Documentary
The Guardian
Mar 21, 2013 - We Went to War, Michael Grigsby's last film, which revisits the ... Texas, where he first met traumatised Vietnam vets in 1970 for I Was a Soldier.
www.moviemail.com › Blog › Cinema Reviews
Mar 29, 2013 - The death last week of British documentary maker Michael Grigsbyadds poignance to this last work, a follow-up to his acclaimed 1970 film
thedfg.org/news/.../we-went-to-war-by-michael-grigsby-and-rebekah-toll...
Mar 22, 2013 - A masterpiece four decades in the making, Grigsby first travelled to Texas in 1970 to make I Was A Soldier; one of the first films about young ...
film.thedigitalfix.com/content/id/69490/i-wassoldier.html
 Rating: 8/10 - ‎Review by Anthony Nield
Nov 26, 2008 - A rare chance to catch up with Michael Grigsby's superb 1970 documentary on Vietnam veterans. Anthony Nield reviews this French Region 0 ...

www.wewenttowarthemovie.com/
“Michael Grigsby began directing films as a schoolboy in the 1950s. He went on to make series of films documenting working life, the impacts of the Vietnam War ...
  1. We Went To War - Trailer - YouTube
www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDst1sgNEGw
Jun 24, 2012 - Uploaded by Rebekah Tolley
In 1970, British director Michael Grigsby made one of the first films about soldiers returning home from the ...
  1. We Went to War (2012) - IMDb
www.imdb.com/title/tt1982713/
Internet Movie Database
 Rating: 6.7/10 - ‎43 votes
Directed by Michael Grigsby. ... Videos. We Went to War -- In 1970, three young Texas soldiers reflected on life. 1 video | 1 news article ». Learn more ...
  1. WE WENT to WAR | Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/WeWentToWar
Genre: Non fiction. Directed By: Michael Grigsby. http://www.wewenttowarthemovie.com/. Photos. WE WENT TO WAR at the Festival International Signes de Nuit ...
  1. Michael Grigsby - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Grigsby
Wikipedia
As a critic noted, "from Michael Grigsby back to John Grierson runs an unbroken .... In 2012 Grigsby's non fiction feature, 'We Went to War' was released.
  1. Michael Grigsby obituary | Film | The Guardian
www.theguardian.com › Culture › Movies › Documentary
The Guardian
Mar 21, 2013 - We Went to War, Michael Grigsby's last film, which revisits the Vietnam veterans of 1970, is to be screened at the Institute of Contemporary Arts ...
  1. Film of the week: We Went to War | BFI
www.bfi.org.uk › ... › Reviews and recommendations
British Film Institute
Apr 29, 2014 - The late documentary poet Michael Grigsby's swansong is a deft and delicate portrait of three Vietnam war veterans, finds Wally Hammond.
  1. We Went to War by Michael Grigsby and Rebekah ... - DFG
thedfg.org/news/.../we-went-to-war-by-michael-grigsby-and-rebekah-toll...
Mar 22, 2013 - We Went To War by Michael Grigsby and Rebekah Tolley is a poignant exploration of the impact the Vietnam War had on the lives of veterans ...
  1. We Went to War - Film Directory - Irish Film Board
directory.irishfilmboard.ie/films/1040-we-went-to-war
'We Went to War' A 'True Stories' production for Film4 A Film by Michael Grigsby & Rebekah Tolley. In 1970, a young British director Michael Grigsby made the ...
  1. WE WENT TO WAR by Michael Grigsby and Rebekah Tolley ...
www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/rebekah.../war-documentary_b_3052792.ht...
Apr 12, 2013 - Our journey with WE WENT TO WAR started on a rainy afternoon in London in December 2007. In between developing project ideas with ...


Review by Thomas Brinson of We Went to War
www.inthemindfield.com/about-in-the-mind-field/
The writers share the view that the Vietnam War was an act of aggression by the United States and its ... Ordnance Officer in Vietnam, Thomas Brinson landed back home at National Airport in Washington, DC .... War's Never-Ending Aftermath.
https://www.facebook.com/WeWentToWar?fref=photo
Fantastic review of WE WENT TO WAR by Vietnam Veteran Thomas Brinson for 'In The Mind Field'. A peace ... War's Never-Ending Aftermath | In The Mind Field.

See Brinson’s review in VFP Newsletter (Fall 2014).  Brinson hopes the film will be widely shown during 2015, the 50th anniversary of the start of US direct combat ops in Vietnam.


Suffering of Vietnamese Civilians During Vietnam War, Google Search, Feb. 18, 2015, Page One
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War_casualties
Wikipedia
Most of the fighting took place in South Vietnam; accordingly it suffered the most .... North Vietnam/Viet Cong military and civilian war dead, 533,000, 1,062,000 ...
www.vice.com/read/vietnam-and-the-mere-gook-rule
Vice
Apr 17, 2013 - But any discussion of Vietnamese civilian suffering is condensed down to a ... Records put together by this Vietnam War Crimes Working Group ...
www.historynet.com/vietnam-war
History Net
Facts and Summary Information & Articles About The Vietnam War Fought ... The U.S.suffered over 47,000 killed in action plus another 11,000 noncombat deaths; ... Among South Vietnam's other allies, Australia had over 400 killed and 2,400 ...
www.npr.org › Arts & Life › Books › Author Interviews NPR
Jan 28, 2013 - "It's suffering on an almost unimaginable scale, and it was generally due to heavy .... On a military tactic used against Vietnamese civilians.
www.motherjones.com/politics/2013/.../rape-wartime-vietn...
Mother Jones
Mar 19, 2013 - There are more than 30,000 books on the Vietnam War in print. ... Millions of Vietnamese suffered: injuries and deaths, loss, privation, hunger, ...
alphahistory.com/vietnam/costs-of-the-vietnam-war/
The human and economic costs of the Vietnam War were devastating. ... by the borders of Vietnam, with both Laos and Cambodia suffering enormous ... of Americandeaths was well documented, neither the South Vietnamese, the North ...
www.vn-agentorange.org/edmaterials/cost_of_vn_war.html
“The war in Vietnam primarily—and most heavily— affected the Vietnamese ... Estimates of casualties suffered by the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces ran ...
www.vietnamgear.com › Vietnam War Timeline
Vietnam War Casualties. Number of military casualties in the 1st Indochina war. VietMinh. 500,000 killed (est.) France. French Union Forces. 89,797 killed and ...
www.bbc.co.uk/.../world-asia-2342772...
British Broadcasting Corporation
Aug 28, 2013 - US atrocities were far greater in the Vietnam War than is normally acknowledged, ... In 1968 US soldiers murdered several hundred Vietnamese civiliansin the single ... While the US suffered more than 58,000 dead in the war, ...
Searches related to suffering of Vietnamese civilians Vietnam War


CONTACT PRESIDENT OBAMA
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Contents Vietnam War Newsletter #5, April 9, 2014
EXPLAINING THE WAR: OFFICIAL AND ALTERNATIVES, STRUGGLE TO TELL THE TRUTH OR DEFEND MYTHS
Pres. Obama’s 2012 Vietnam War Memorial Day Speech
Bhatt, US Blames the Victim: Giap Sacrificed His Troops
William Blum:  JFK, RFK
Laurel Krause, Kent State Truth Commission
Tully et al., Educating, Teaching About the War
Kerschner, Poems
THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES:  DESCRIBING THE WAR
Turse, Kill Anything (see Newsletter #4)
AP Photographs of the War
Special Number of Peace and Change Oct. 2013
Leonard Cohen, Story of Isaac
VFP Vietnam Tour 2013: Reparations
VFP Agent Orange Group To Vietnam 2013
Dr. Shay, PTSD
Laos: Victims Speak, Voices from the Plain of Jars


END VIETNAM WAR NEWSLETTER #6 Feb. 18, 2015


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