Saturday, August 8, 2020

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2020

 

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2020

WILL TRUMP RESIGN BEFORE THE ELECTION OR WILL HE BE REELECTED BY RIGGING the SYSTEM, OR AT LEAST THE VOTES, OR WILL HE DECLARE A NATIONAL EMERGENCY AND MARTIAL LAW?  FIVE BOOKS.  Compiled by Dick Bennett

Palast: He will run and win by ballot corruption, mainly from the now far right Republican Party, as modeled by Governor Kemp of Georgia and others.

Levitsky and Ziblatt: He will run and win because US democratic rules and norms have been corrupted mainly by this Republican Party, but if necessary Trump will declare an emergency and martial law.

Applebaum (according to Keller): Trump’s wealthy supporters and his  public relations experts-- “the pamphleteers, bloggers, spin doctors, producers of television programs… who can sell his image to the public”--will ensure his victory.

Aldridge:  Part I relates that soon after WWII the ultra-conservatives, ultra-right-wing neoconservatives, the neocons—all who rejected democracy—began their 70 years of struggle to establish authoritarian government partly via martial law  Trump could be our dictator by martial law.

Hett:  The analogy to Hitler’s takeover of the Weimar Republic suggests a Trump takeover as consequence of all the causes given in the preceding 2 books.

 

Trump will run and win, unless. . . .: each book includes a section on how Trump’s victory could be prevented.  On voting: Bernie Sanders argues in a recent letter, we must do everything we can to create the largest voter turnout in history. As Levitsky and Ziblatt argue: There will be massive corruption, but the Republicans can’t rig a massive turnout that produces a massive rejection of Trump.

Our predicament is as complicated as these writings suggest.

To the question, will he resign? Greg Palast in  How Trump Stole 2020 suggests he will not, because Trump believes he will not be defeated at the polls because he will perform as  Palast’s title says:  he will copy nationally what Georgia’s Gov. Kemp accomplished with extraordinarily successful deviousness: he will deny enough Democrats, mainly Blacks, the vote, “via purge, disqualifications, and the mass rejection of provisional, absentee, and paper ballot.” (296).  Palast is a superlative scholar of the vulnerableness of our electoral system, as his book shows page after page, backed up by his earlier book Billionaires and Ballot Bandits.   In both books he suggests remedies.

 

Another new book, How Democracies Die  by Levitsky and Ziblatt, makes an even more complex and dismal case that the collapse of our democracy is likely because its two foundations—democratic rules and norms—are being undermined by the two Parties, but mainly from the Republican Party.   The Constitutional (written) rules and the political and social conventions (unwritten rules) that guarded the Constitution no longer protect our politics.  That is, we cannot take for granted mutual toleration or forbearance; the two competing parties no longer accept one another as legitimate rivals, or the idea that politicians should exercise restraint.  To the question, will Trump resign, the authors might cite their story of the Philippines’ Marcos, who, when his second term ended, successfully refused to step down “after declaring martial law” (76), neither rules nor norms strong enough to prevent his dictatorship. 

  

A 3rd  book, according to the following review, fingers Trump’s enablers.

Published July 19, 2020Updated July 20, 2020TWILIGHT OF DEMOCRACY: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism By Anne Applebaum. Reviewed by Bill Keller.

Even before the coronavirus began to test our social order, the world was experiencing another plague, a pandemic of authoritarianism. Over the past decade it has infected democracies around the globe, including our own. Among the first responders were writers offering dystopian fiction and apocalyptic nonfiction, all questioning the durability of democracy under stress.

“The Death of Democracy,” Benjamin Carter Hett’s reconsideration of Weimar Germany, explored how partisan intransigence enabled the rise of Hitler, a lesson clearly intended as a timely warning. In their all-too-credible alarum, “How Democracies Die,” the Harvard political scientists Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt drew on a global roster of recently failed democracies to identify symptoms of would-be autocrats. (Donald Trump checks all the boxes.) In “Surviving Autocracy,” the journalist Masha Gessen, having sharpened a scalpel on Vladimir Putin, dissected Trumpism and concluded that curing it will take more than an election.

Anne Applebaum’s contribution to this discussion, “Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism,” is concerned less with the aspiring autocrats and their compliant mobs than with the mentality of the courtiers who make a tyrant possible: “the writers, intellectuals, pamphleteers, bloggers, spin doctors, producers of television programs and creators of memes who can sell his image to the public.”

Are these enablers true believers or just cynical opportunists? Do they believe the lies they tell and the conspiracies they invent or are they simply greedy for wealth and power? The answers she reaches are frankly equivocal, which in our era of dueling absolutes is commendable if sometimes a little frustrating.

Applebaum, an American journalist who lives mostly in Poland, has earned accolades (including a Pulitzer Prize) for prodigiously researched popular histories of the Cold War, the Gulag and Stalin’s forced famine in Ukraine. “Twilight of Democracy” is less substantial, a magazine essay expanded into a book that is part rumination, part memoir.

A 4TH book, Bob Aldridge, The Goodness Field: A Guidebook for Proactive Nonviolence.( 2020)  offers a summary of post-WWII US transformations into a new way of life to protect US “vital interests” (access to the world’s resources):

Part I Understanding Our Opponent: Egothink

Chapter 2, The Culture of Entertainment and Pax Americana.: the ultra-conservatives, ultra-right-wing neoconservatives, neocons.

    Section 1, Culture of Entertainment:  consumption as a way of life, TV,, social media

    Section 2, “Pax Americana—Structuring for World Hegemony” (33-): Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, NATO, global bases, CIA, NSA

Chapter 3, Rise of the Neocons.

Chapter 4, Deconstructing Democracy, pp. 84-93, quick history of US martial law. 
Begins with the Reichstag fire Feb. 27, 1933 and martial law, Nazi Party and Hitler fixed in power (69).  Chap. 4 divided into 2 parts:: 1) the 3 major consolidations in the Executive Branch and 2) martial law.

Chapter 5, Divide and Deceive: the deluded populace, bound in martial law, provide no significant resistance.

Parts II and III Nonviolent Resistance  

 

  The four books trace main ideas and practices—Palast:  our voting, L and Z : our political culture, Applebaum: the president’s supporters, and Aldridge: the rise of the neocon/military culture and declaration of martial law--to expose the increasing fracturing of our democratic political foundations.

 

 

A 5th book analyzes the collapse of another democracy whose Constitution was modeled at least in part upon that of the US.  The Death of Democracy: Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic by Benjamin Carter Hett explains why democracy fell apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s.     His book’s title denotes two converging plots, which are best understood  by WWI. 

Weimar Republic’s under the moderate, multi-Party Social Democratic Party coalition reached “high civilization,” an “enlightened, creative, ultramodern [constitutional] democracy,”  “unrivalled” in “science and  scholarship,” spectacular in literature, music, film.  Simultaneously its conservative government under President Paul von Hindenburg, his officials, and the army “held the keys to power.”  They “moved [and polarized] the Republic politically to the right.”    They could have stopped Hitler, but chose to “use him.”  In little more than a decade  the Weimar Republic had become a brutal totalitarianism, “the most evil regime in human history” (7-12). 

Adolph Hitler was “the most historically important individual of the twentieth century”— skilled demagog, “clever political strategist.”  But even his extraordinary “talents cannot fully explain Hitler’s success.”  There was the chaos created by the war, which made the workings of democracy—its compromising, its frequent turnover of administrations-- seem contemptible and “soulless”; to which the Nazis responded by rejecting “a rational, factual world” via “conspiracy theories” to explain also Germany’s defeat (Communists, capitalist, Jews),.  What was needed was a providential leader and rule by emergency powers and executive orders. 

 “There was nothing the Nazis did in the years after 1933 that was not prefigured in their rise to power.”  Keen observers saw what was coming: dictatorship, martial law, abolition of parliament, crushing of liberties, terror, war.  What they did not foresee was the public’s acceptance. (13-14). 

 

 

Thursday, August 6, 2020

HIROSHIMA/NAGASAKI REMEMBRANCE AND ABOLITION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS 2020

OMNI

HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI, AUGUST 6 AND 9, 2020, #2

REMEMBRANCE/ABOLITION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS

Compiled by Dick Bennett for a Culture of Peace, Justice, and Ecology

http://omnicenter.org/donate/

 

CONTENTS:  HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI, AUGUST 6 AND 9 (1945), 2020, #2

 

Remember Hiroshima: Thursday August 6, 7pm, Pulaski County

WAND, ACPJ, Pax Christi
Watch Online.

NATIONAL REMEMBRANCES 2020 FOR ABOLISHING NUCLEAR WEAPONS

Peace Action:   Honoring survivors, 75 years later

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Special Coverage of 4 Articles  8-3-20

 What Europeans believe about Hiroshima and Nagasaki—and why it matters 

 

Memorial Days: the racial underpinnings of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings

 

 

 

August 8 Tokyo House Party: Atomic Art

MORE July 27, 2020  MORE

Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security

Resources: TANIGUCHI’s memoir, The Atomic Bomb on My
       Back,
and a film of the bombings.

Beyond the Bomb

War Resisters League, Ban the Nukes!

Global Zero

 

3 NEW BOOKS Reviewed by Publishers Weekly

The Button: The New Nuclear Arms Race and Presidential Power from Truman to Trump by William J. Perry and Tom Z. Collina.   BenBella, 2020.  (334p).

Fallout: The Hiroshima Cover-Up and the Reporter Who Revealed It to the World by Lesley M. M. Blume. Simon & Schuster, 2020,.$27 (288p) .

Gambling with Armageddon: Nuclear Roulette from Hiroshima to the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1945–1962 by Martin J. Sherwin.    Knopf, 2020.  
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TEXTS

Honoring survivors, 75 years later

Jon Rainwater, Peace Action 

Thu, Jul 30, 1:17 PM (4 days ago)

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Friend,

As you may know, this year marks an unfortunate anniversary: the 75th year of the nuclear age.
 
On July 16, 1945, the world was forever changed when the first nuclear bomb was exploded in New Mexico. Three weeks later, on August 6, the United States dropped a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima; on August 9, the United States dropped another nuclear bomb on Nagasaki.
 
Survivors of those attacks and of the next few decades of testing and nuclear weapons production are still here. But so are the weapons. While this anniversary is an appropriate time to acknowledge and mourn the loss of life our fellow Americans caused on that day, it is also an opportunity to look to the future.
 
That’s why Peace Action is proud to join with more than 100 other organizations worldwide to honor the survivors of the world’s most gruesome and deadly attack — and to embrace our role in ensuring these weapons are never used again.
 
On August 7th, from 6:30 pm - 8 pm ET, along with our New Hampshire affiliate, Peace Action will be hosting an online event to commemorate the 75th anniversary of those tragic bombings, and to honor those who somehow survved through it.

Every year, all over the world, people gather to remember the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year will be a little different. On the seventy-fifth anniversary of those bombings, you can gather with American and international peace groups for a live streaming remembrance hosted by our own Kevin Martin, President of Peace Action. The ceremony will be led by Reverend Elizabeth Theoharis, co-chair of the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival, and will feature Masako Wada, who was a young girl in Nagasaki and survived the bombing. She is now the Assistant Secretary-General of Nihon Hidankyo, the Japanese organization of survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
We would love for you to join us! 
Please RSVP here. In the run-up to this remembrance, please share this online event with your friends, explore this website honoring the Hibakusha (survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki), and read the stories of these survivors of the terrible legacy of nuclear weapons.
 We all have a role to play in raising awareness about this anniversary, and I need your help to make this event as successful as possible. 
I hope you’ll join us.
In Peace and Remembrance,
 Jon Rainwater
Executve Director
Peace Action

Peace Action
P.O. Box 8637
Silver Spring, MD 20907
          

 

 

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists  8-3-20

Hiroshima & Nagasaki Special Coverage

8:12 AM (2 hours ago)

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What Europeans believe about Hiroshima and Nagasaki—and why it matters  Did the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki shorten the war, and were they necessary to force the Japanese surrender? Historians have long challenged this narrative, but a significant number of Europeans still believe it--and that has ramifications for the support of disarmament policies. Read more.

 

NUCLEAR RISK

Memorial Days: the racial underpinnings of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings

This past Memorial Day, a Minneapolis police officer knelt on the throat of George Floyd for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. Seventy-five years ago, an American pilot dropped an atomic bomb on the civilian population of Hiroshima. Worlds apart in time, space, and scale, the two events share key features. Read more.

 

 

 

Create a #stillhere social media frame

Share a visual remembrance of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki with this social media profile frame created by #stillhere, a coalition of organizations putting on national virtual events related to the anniversaries of the Bombings. Create your frame.

 

 

 

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

August 8 Tokyo House Party: Atomic Art

 

Bulletin associate editor Matt Field will join a Tokyo House Party to talk "art, activism, and aspiration in our Atomic Age" with Dr. Yuki Miyamoto of DePaul University, whose work centers on nuclear discourse and environmental ethics. Stream the event live on Twitch. Learn more

 

 

MORE FROM BULLETIN OF THE ATOMIC SCIENTISTS

 

NUCLEAR RISK

Arms control 2.0? With open source tools, desktop sleuths can go where governments won’t

The potential for monitoring and verification has been transformed by new information technologies. Though the Trump administration has left the Open Skies Treaty, other means may support the transparency and confidence-building functions of verification arrangements. Read more.

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT'S NEW AT THE BULLETIN

Bulletin Global Webinar: Why the Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima Would Be Illegal Today

 

Join a Bulletin Global Webinar featuring Science and Security Board member Scott Sagan and international legal scholar Allen Weiner, who dive into the legal considerations and moral reasoning used in 1945 to justify the attack on Hiroshima. Bulletin columnist Sara Kutchesfahani, director of the N Square DC Hub, will lead the conversation. Read the article by Sagan, Weiner, and co-author Kathrine McKinneyThen register for this free webinar.

 

WHAT'S NEW AT THE BULLETIN

The International Symposium for Peace 2020

 

On July 31, Bulletin president and CEO Rachel Bronson will join a symposium titled “The Road to Nuclear Weapons Abolition: Steps Ahead in Global Danger.” The program is part of the International Symposium for Peace 2020 and hosted by the Nagasaki city government, The Asahi Shimbun, and other organizations. Dr. Bronson's panel discussion with former Secretary of Defense William Perry will be live-streamed free. Learn more.

 

 

 

BULLETIN OF THE ATOMIC SCIENTISTS

 

July 27, 2020

 

 

 

NUCLEAR RISK

Arms control 2.0? With open source tools, desktop sleuths can go where governments won’t

The potential for monitoring and verification has been transformed by new information technologies. Though the Trump administration has left the Open Skies Treaty, other means may support the transparency and confidence-building functions of verification arrangements. Read more.

 

 

 

 

WHAT'S NEW AT THE BULLETIN

Bulletin Global Webinar: Why the Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima Would Be Illegal Today

 

Join a Bulletin Global Webinar featuring Science and Security Board member Scott Sagan and international legal scholar Allen Weiner, who dive into the legal considerations and moral reasoning used in 1945 to justify the attack on Hiroshima. Bulletin columnist Sara Kutchesfahani, director of the N Square DC Hub, will lead the conversation. Read the article by Sagan, Weiner, and co-author Kathrine McKinneyThen register for this free webinar.

 

WHAT'S NEW AT THE BULLETIN

The International Symposium for Peace 2020

 

On July 31, Bulletin president and CEO Rachel Bronson will join a symposium titled “The Road to Nuclear Weapons Abolition: Steps Ahead in Global Danger.” The program is part of the International Symposium for Peace 2020 and hosted by the Nagasaki city government, The Asahi Shimbun, and other organizations. Dr. Bronson's panel discussion with former Secretary of Defense William Perry will be live-streamed free. Learn more.

Hiroshima coverage from Richard Rhodes, Alex Wellerstein, Hidehiko Yuzakihttps://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/profile_mask2.png

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists  August 6, 2020

8:04 AM (52 minutes ago)

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HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

Counting the dead at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

How many people died in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? It's complicated. Historian Alex Wellerstein examines the conflicting reports, observing that various numbers are deployed primarily as a form of moral calculus. Read more.

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

A message from Hiroshima on the reality of the atomic bombing

Many A-bomb survivors have long been working as storytellers at the cost of their emotional pain. Why have the urgings of the victims of the atomic bombings and of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki for the abolition of nuclear weapons been betrayed for so long? Read the message from Hidehiko Yuzaki, governor of Hiroshima Prefecture. Read more.

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

The atomic bomb and common security

Since the first use of nuclear weapons in war, 75 years ago today, people concerned with the danger of large-scale nuclear war keep rediscovering a powerful tool for its prevention. Richard Rhodes outlines the "only answer to the clear and present danger of nuclear destruction." Read more.

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

Statement from the Bulletin's Science and Security Board

On the 75th anniversaries of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Bulletin's Science and Security Board calls on all states to use their scientific and technical prowess to reduce rather than increase nuclear risks and refrain from new nuclear weapon capabilities that fuel nuclear arms races. Read more.

 

 

 

#stillhere: 75 Years of Shared Nuclear Legacy

Take time today, the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, to sign the Hibakusha Appeal for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Then, join national, virtual events commemorating the anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

 

 

 

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

Hiroshima and COVID-19

With both COVID-19 and nuclear weapons, we have no choice but to call upon the remarkable capacity of the human species for adaptation. Such adaptation is by no means passive and must combine political will with scientific knowledge. Read more.

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

Watch Now: "Why the atomic bombing of Hiroshima would be illegal today" Global Webinar

On Monday, the Bulletin hosted a global webinar featuring Scott Sagan, Bulletin SASB member and Caroline S.G. Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University; Allen Weiner, director of the Stanford Program in International and Comparative Law; led by Bulletin columnist Sara Kutchesfahani, director of N Square DC Hub. Watch now.

 

 

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

Reflecting on the 75th Anniversary of Hiroshima


Bulletin executive chair, former California Governor Jerry Brown, and president and CEO Rachel Bronson will appear at the first ever virtual Aspen Security Forum today at 11:45 am Central. Join the forum to explore the most pressing foreign policy and national security issues of the day facing the US and its allies. Watch now.

HIROSHIMA & NAGASAKI

Transforming Our Nuclear Legacy

Bulletin president and CEO Rachel Bronson joins Humanity Rising this morning at 10 am Central to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Join in to explore pathways forward to the elimination of nuclear weapons. Watch on YouTube.

 

QUOTE OF THE DAY

"Earnestly desiring the elimination of nuclear weapons without delay, we, the Hibakusha, call on all State Governments to conclude a treaty to ban and eliminate nuclear weapons."

-- The International Signature Campaign in Support of the Appeal of the Hibakusha for the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

 

 

 

 

                

 

Copyright © 2020 Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

All Rights Reserved | Email: newsletter@thebulletin.org

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Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security

Joseph Gerson <cpdcs@mg2.lglcrm.net> Unsubscribe

8:39 AM (17 minutes ago)

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to me  8-1-20

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Friends,

This is the promised follow up with links to Hiroshima and Nagasaki 75th anniversary webinars, events and resources.

ACTIONS

Let me begin with two resources that will take you more deeply into the human meetings of the Atomic Bombings than almost anything else.

First is Sumiteru TANIGUCHI’s memoir, The Atomic Bomb on My Back. Translated from the Japanese and edited by yours truly, it provides the painful history of one of the most tortured A-Bomb survivors, his courageous commitment to live a loving and full life, and the story of the creation and activities of the Hibakusha movement for nuclear weapons abolition and to secure government assistance. The book can be pre-ordered online. But you can get two blessings with one payment, by making a $100 contribution to the Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security. It will help us to keep on keepin’ on. Donate at https://www.cpdcs.org/donate/

The other is the searing 17-minute Hiroshima Nagasaki 1945 is comprised of film footage taken by Japanese photographers and locked away in a Pentagon vault for 20 years to prevent the Soviet Union from using it for propaganda purposes. It’s upsetting to watch, but like the video of George Floyd’s murder, it documents truths that we must know:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arONMWblvG8&has_verified=1

A fact sheet that you can use for writing letters to the editor and op-eds can be found at https://www.afsc.org/document/remembering-hiroshima-and-nagasaki-fact-sheet

You can sign and circulate the Hibakusha Signature Appeal at: https://www.hiroshimanagasaki75.org/hibakusha-appeal

For those of you in Massachusetts, you can find a listing of local events at:

https://masspeaceaction.org/commemorate-the-75th-anniversary-of-hiroshima-and-nagasaki/?emci=0e9112ec-3bcc-ea11-9b05-00155d03bda0&=&

You can join the 2020 World Conference against A and H Bombs (Online):

August 2, 6 and 9,

The Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security advocates for peace and disarmament with justice. Our priorities include working for Common Security diplomacy among the great powers, as well as serving as a bridge between peace and nuclear disarmament movements in the U.S., Europe and Asia, and contributing to intersectional organizing.

 We depend on your contributions. You can donate at: https://www.cpdcs.org/donate/

 


Your Monthly Lowdown from Beyond the Bomb: August Edition 2020

The Beyond the Bomb Team via ActionNetwork.org campaigns@beyondthebomb.org via email.actionnetwork.org  8-3-20

1:00 PM (5 hours ago)

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Dick,

This week marks an important and somber commemoration: the 75th anniversary of the nuclear attacks on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

75 years ago
, the United States devastated the populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing hundreds of thousands of people in an instant, destroying infrastructure, and causing long-term detrimental health effects for millions. 75 years ago, the United States began a war on civilians all over the world by testing these world-ending weapons.

75 years later
, we are badly off course in efforts to honor the plea of the Hibakusha, those impacted by the nuclear blasts, and end the nuclear threat. 75 years later, nuclear weapons are still here. Unless we dismantle the system, the chance that these weapons will be used again is high.

Nuclear weapons may still be here, but so are survivors and activists working to eliminate this threat. We hope you will join us in taking action this anniversary to commemorate the bombings and ensure nothing like this ever happens again.

#StillHere: 75 Years of Shared Nuclear Legacy
Our coalition of anti-nuclear activists is humbled to host a 
national virtual event commemorating the 75th anniversaries. Join us on Thursday, August 6 at 11am ET and Sunday, August 9 at 2pm ET for highlights from local events nationwide, stories from survivors, and a look toward the future of a world free from nuclear threats. Watch the livestream here.

And 
find out more about our coalition to commemorate the anniversaries and how we’re pressing our leaders to take necessary actions to ensure nuclear weapons are never used again.

Talk about the anniversaries on social media
We need to get loud this week to call attention to these anniversaries and the way forward. And you can do this using social media, specifically using the hashtags #StillHere, #75YearsOf, and #HiroshimaNagasaki75. Here’s some suggested social media actions:

1.    Click to tweet about our national virtual event happening Thursday and Sunday

2.    Retweet stories of survivors

3.    Follow and engage with us on Instagram

4.    Like and share our Facebook post

5.    Search the hashtag #StillHere on Twitter to see other tweets to uplift

Sign the Hibakusha appeal
For more than 70 years since the atomic bombings, the survivors, known as Hibakusha, have struggled to live on, afflicted by delayed health and environmental effects. Never again can we allow such tragedies to be repeated. Americans must support the Hibakusha and over 10 million Japanese community members by calling on the U.S. government to work towards the elimination of all nuclear weapons and fight for a livable future. Sign the Hibakusha Appeal to call on U.S. leaders to work toward global nuclear disarmament.

Talk to your reps about justice for New Mexicans
This week especially, we cannot forget that New Mexicans were the first victims of nuclear weapons. The area of the Trinity Test site has reported high rates of cancer, birth defects, and other issues that can be linked to the nuclear fallout. 
Visit your reps virtually or write your reps to let them know that supporting the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2019 is the LEAST Congress can do to make amends for nuclear testing that continues to harm people and the planet.

Sign and share the No First Use pledge
On the 75th anniversary of the only time nuclear weapons have been used in war, it’s long past time to make sure this never happens again. We can do this through instituting a No First Use policy and paving the way toward the elimination of these weapons. There are no circumstances in which the United States could use nuclear weapons first without suffering horrific consequences and inflicting the loss of hundreds of thousands of innocent lives. 
Sign and share our No First Use pledge.

DONATE TO BEYOND THE BOMB

In solidarity,
The

Honor those impacted by the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Beyond the Bomb via ActionNetwork.org campaigns@beyondthebomb.org via email.actionnetwork.org 

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Dick,

With so much turmoil in the world right now, it can be difficult to step back to truly assess where we are. But, now, more than ever, we must commit to remembering the past, to never repeat the atrocities of yesterday and to learn how to create a brighter future.

This year marks 75 years since the beginning of the nuclear age. Join us on the anniversaries of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki to honor those lost as well as all survivors of nuclear violence around the world.

On July 16, 1945, the first nuclear weapons test was conducted in New Mexico. Then, three weeks later, on August 6, the U.S. dropped a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima. Days later, on August 9, the U.S. dropped a second nuclear bomb on Nagasaki. Hundreds of thousands lost their lives on those two horrific days — and more have followed in the years since due to the long term effects of radiation exposure. But, survivors of those attacks and of the nuclear weapons industrial complex are #stillhere, sharing their stories and asking for justice. Sadly, these terrible weapons are also #stillhere. We have so much to learn from those impacted by nuclear violence. And, we have a responsibility to join them in action.

That’s why Beyond the Bomb is proud to join more than 100 other organizations worldwide in honoring the survivors of the world’s most gruesome and deadly attack — and in ensuring these weapons are never used again. Listen to survivors tell their stories, learn how to get involved in your community, and push back against the nuclear status quo through our live streamed events.

TUNE IN ON AUGUST 6TH AND 9TH.

Please RSVP and share the online event with your friends! Together, we can make a difference. We all have a role to play in raising awareness about this anniversary, and we need your help to show the world that we will not rest as long as these weapons are #stillhere. We hope you’ll join us.

Forward,

Yasmeen, and the Beyond the Bomb team

 

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War Resisters League 8-6-20

3:04 PM (1 hour ago)

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Dear friends,

August 6th and August 9th this week mark the 75th year since the United States used nuclear weapons on civilians living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The bombings killed over 200,000 people. To this day, survivors are #stillhere and fighting for the abolition of nuclear weapons.

As we remember the incredible violence of these days, which irreparably changed the course of history, we also look to the future. 75 years later, it is completely unacceptable that nuclear weapons still exist.

It's time to abolish nuclear weapons.

 

Here's how you can be part of the work to abolish nuclear weapons:

 

1. Join the International Campaign for the Abolition of Nuclear weapons (ICAN) campaign to get cities to take steps in support of the Nuclear Ban Treaty.

2. Read and share this piece on Korean survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings.

3. Write letters to Judge Wood in support of the King's Bay Plowshares.

 

In Solidarity, 

The WRL Team

 



It's possible to end war, but it will take all of us. War Resisters League needs every single person to stand with us in the fight against US imperialism, militarism, and the expanding war machine during a time where fascists are in power across multiple countries. Like what you're reading? Forward this email to a friend. New readers can subscribe here.

If you really need to take a break, you can click here to unsubscribe – and we hope you'll join us again!

 

 

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Derek from Global Zero via email.actionnetwork.org 8-6-20

8:30 AM (15 minutes ago)

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“Nuclear weapons should be abolished to ensure a peaceful future. The damage of atomic bombings should not be repeated. The pain of the victims of that day must not be forgotten.
We must not allow nuclear weapons to continue to exist.”
Reiko Yamada, Hibakusha

Dick,

75 years ago today, the United States launched the first nuclear strike in history, laying waste to the city of Hiroshima with a single, devastating bomb. Three days later, a second atomic weapon was dropped on the city of Nagasaki. An estimated 200,000 civilians died in the attacks and many more were injured.

The stories of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Japan — known as Hibakusha — are living reminders of why we must never abandon our work. There can be no more Hiroshimas or Nagasakis. The only way to ensure these weapons are never used again is to eliminate them. All of them, everywhere.

We’re commemorating the anniversaries all week by shining a light on these barbaric attacks, amplifying stories of survivors, and outlining bold steps toward a nuclear weapons-free future. We invite you to follow along on Facebook and Twitter and share these vital stories.

SHARE ON FACEBOOK

 

SHARE ON TWITTER

75 years is too long to live under the threat of nuclear violence. While many believe the prospect of nuclear conflict receded with the end of the Cold War, the truth is that today’s nuclear risks are as high or higher than any point in history. We must not wait for a catastrophe before we act.

As grim as it looks today, we can’t lose sight of the bigger picture. Over the last 30 years, we’ve eradicated more than 80% of the global nuclear stockpile — from its peak of 70,000 to the estimated 13,400 that remain today.

With bold leadership and sustained public pressure, zero can be accomplished within a decade. 
The only obstacles are political.

Global Zero has a plan to eliminate nuclear weapons in our lifetime, and it’s backed by an unprecedented global network of current and former senior political leaders, military commanders, and national security experts that spans the political spectrum and transcends borders and conflict zones. We are working every day to set that plan in motion.

Thank you for all of your support to achieve a world without nuclear weapons.

Onward,
Derek Johnson
Executive Director of Global Zero

P.S. Join us for virtual events to commemorate these anniversaries. Don’t miss Jon Wolfsthal, Senior Adviser to Global Zero and Director of the Nuclear Crisis Group, who will be doing a live “Ask Me Anything” this Sunday, August 9 at 3:25pm ET.

 

THREE BOOK REVIEWS FROM PUBLISHER’S WEEKLY https://www.publishersweekly.com/images/logo-consumer.jpg

The Button: The New Nuclear Arms Race and Presidential Power from Truman to Trump by William J. Perry and Tom Z. Collina.   BenBella, 2020.  (334p).

Perry (My Journey at the Nuclear Brink), who served as secretary of defense under Bill Clinton, and global security analyst Collina expose the lack of checks and balances to prevent U.S. presidents from triggering nuclear war in this well-documented call for reform. Cataloguing seven decades of domestic policy developments and international power struggles over nuclear arms, including General MacArthur’s tug-of-war with President Truman over nuclear authorization during the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the 1980s Strategic Defense Initiative (commonly known as Star Wars), Perry and Collina argue that presidential monopoly on “the button” has reached a new level of danger under President Trump, whom they regard as a uniquely unstable leader. Their policy suggestions include an end to sole presidential nuclear authority, a prohibition on the first use of nuclear weapons by the U.S., and sustained diplomatic engagement with Iran and North Korea. Perry’s insider perspective on disarmament negotiations between the U.S. and Russia and the vulnerability of the U.S. arsenal to cyberattacks illuminates, but generalists will find themselves overwhelmed with policy minutiae. Still, this authoritative account reveals the true extent of the nuclear threat.   Publisher’s Weekly June 2020.

 

https://www.publishersweekly.com/images/reviews-star-19b.png Fallout: The Hiroshima Cover-Up and the Reporter Who Revealed It to the World by Lesley M. M. Blume. Simon & Schuster, 2020,. $27 (288p) .

Journalist Blume (Everybody Behaves Badly) delivers a thrilling behind-the-scenes account of John Hersey’s seminal 1946 report on the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. In the months after Japan’s surrender, Hersey hatched a plan with New Yorker managing editor William Shawn to go into Hiroshima as a “Trojan horse reporter” and describe the bomb’s impact from the victims’ point of view. Blume balances her narrative between Hersey’s journalistic process and Shawn’s editorial decision-making, which culminated in convincing New Yorker founder Harold Ross to devote the entire Aug. 29, 1946, issue to the story. She also documents the dramatic impact of Hersey’s report, which was eventually published as a book, on the public perception of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, and its continued resonance in the debate over nuclear arms. Hersey, she notes, devoted all the proceeds from the work to the American Red Cross and didn’t return to Japan for 40 years. Blume builds tension by expertly interweaving scenes at the New Yorker offices (where Ross and Shawn kept most staffers in the dark right up until publication), with Hersey’s journey into Japan and his search for survivors, and vividly captures a pre-television era when evidence of the nuclear fallout was suppressed by the U.S. government. This enthralling, fine-grained chronicle reveals what it takes to cut through “dangerously anesthetizing” statistics and speak truth to power. (Aug.)

Correction: An earlier version of this review incorrectly referred to William Shawn as Wallace Shawn.

DETAILS

Reviewed on : 06/03/2020   Release date: 08/04/2020
Downloadable Audio - 978-1-7971-0887-2


 Gambling with Armageddon: Nuclear Roulette from Hiroshima to the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1945–1962. By Martin J. Sherwin. Knopf, 2020.  (624p) .

Blunders, misunderstandings, and “dumb luck” shape history in this captivating reevaluation of post-WWII nuclear brinksmanship. Examining America’s use of atomic weaponry to contain Soviet expansion in Asia and the Americas, Pulitzer winner Sherwin (coauthor, American Prometheus) relates in nerve-jangling detail how presidents Truman, Eisenhower, and Kennedy grappled with their Soviet counterparts, Stalin and Khrushchev. According to Sherwin’s portrayal, Truman was “intellectually and emotionally unprepared” to understand the atomic high stakes and often deferred to his hawkish secretary of state, James F. Byrnes. Entangled in an affair with a White House intern, Kennedy wavered during the Cuban Missile Crisis and depended on his brother, Robert, to back-channel with the Soviets to avoid nuclear war. According to Sherwin, military personnel countermanded orders to launch nuclear weapons on multiple occasions during the two-week confrontation. In one instance, a U.S. missile squadron on Okinawa was poised to fire 32 nuclear missiles at targets in China and the Soviet Union before deciding to stand down. Intricately detailed, vividly written, and nearly Tolstoyan in scope, Sherwin’s account reveals just how close the Cold War came to boiling over. History buffs will be enthralled. (Sept.)

DETAILS   Reviewed on : 06/19/2020   Release date: 09/22/2020

 

 

CONTENTS: HIROSHIMA/NAGASAKI and NUCLEAR ABOLITION 2020 NEWSLETTER #1

https://jamesrichardbennett.blogspot.com/2020/07/omni-hiroshimanagasaki-and-nuclear.html

Webinar Sat. 7-25 on Decision to Drop the Bomb, Carolyn Forché 
      Moderator

ICAN Webinar on the Illegality of the Bomb Today, August 3

New Memoir of Hiroshima Bombing: The Atomic Bomb on My Back, Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security

Hiroshima Survivors: Webinars Presented by AR WAND

ICAN: International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

Nuclear Age Peace Foundation Remembers Hiroshima and Nagasaki

World Conference 2020  by Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security

Global Zero

Protest at Oak Ridge

 

END HIROSHIMA NAGASAKI REMEMBRANCE AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS ABOLITION, AUGUST 6 AND 9, 2020, #2


Dick's Wars and Warming KPSQ Radio Editorials (#1-48)

Dick's Wars and Warming KPSQ Radio Editorials (#1-48)